Paige’s Interview with Silvia

InterviewsCollegeStudents

In my quest to find out if college is worth the effort, I interviewed my friend, Silvia, about her pursuit of a college education and life after she earned her Bachelor’s Degree. Silvia is a college graduate of California State University, Bakersfield (CSUB) and she graduated with a B.A. in Liberal Arts.

Fast Facts:

Hometown: Bakersfield, California

Favorite Color: Royal Blue

Dream Job: School Counselor or ESL specialist in a migrant school/community

1. What were your top college picks & why?

CSUB (close to home and strong teaching programs), and UCSB (first campus I ever visited, plus it’s Santa Barbara).

2. Why did you choose CSUB?

I went to CSUB since it was cheaper. I could live at home (no paying rent or room and board) and I could work at my old high school, where I could get experience working with students.

3. When you applied to CSUB, did you think you’d get in?

I though I was going to get in since it is the university in my hometown but there was some doubt however, I am glad I got in.

4. What did you do in high school to prepare for college?

In high school I took many honors/AP classes, I was also a part of the AVID program and really talked to my counselor who helped me get everything I needed to get to college.

5. What drew you to your current career goal or field instead of others?

I guess ever since I was a little girl I wanted to teach so I took the teaching route at CSUB. Ones I was done with my BA and went on to the credential program I got more experience working with students of different age groups and realized I wanted to focus more in counseling students in order to help them get to college the same way my councilors helped me. Also, since I was an ELA student I know I can relate to other students in that same position therefore I am currently looking into a masters program for English as a second language, which I can use to teach and help students of any age group.

6. How important is happiness in your future career?

For me happiness is the main goal of my career because if you are happy doing what you love work will never seem like work. As Confucius ones said “Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.”

7. What do you expect to get out of college?

I expected to get the knowledge/tools needed to get me into the job of my dreams. I expected to come out wiser and ready to conquer any job that I was presented with.

8. Before you started college, what was your vision of life after attaining a college degree and how has that vision changed?

Before starting college my vision was to be done with BA in 4 years and credentials in 1 and start teaching a 2nd grade classroom after only 5 years of college. After college I realized that I wanted to take a different route (which most of us frequently do ones in college), I wanted to do more than teaching I wanted to impact the lives of more students and be there to guide them trough academics and be their support and encouragement to get into college and to do more with their lives. Even though my goals changed I know for a fact that thanks to my BA in Liberal Arts I can continue my studies in the areas I want and I will have some background knowledge into what college is and what it means to work with students.

9. What is the greatest challenge that you’ve faced in your efforts to gain an education?

Transition between high school and college.

As a first generation college student I did not have a family member to tell me exactly what to expect in college and many things were different than in high school; however, I was able to find many helpful professors and advisors along the way who helped me get to where I am now.

10. If you could go back in time and talk to your younger self, what would you say?

I’d tell myself to work harder and to not be afraid of a harder class or to take a class that does not belong in my major, specially if that class seems interesting, since it might spark a different passion/goal in life that can lead to something better. I’d also tell my self to do all the assign readings!! Since you never know what you can find that might make even a hard/boring class into the best class you’d ever take.

11. Has your pursuit of a higher education been worth it?

YES!! 100%

12. Do you think you would have been better off just getting a job or skipping college altogether?

No, I do know there are good jobs out there that do not require a college degree but the experience/knowledge you get in a college degree is unique, no one can take that away from you, and it’s an opportunity to know who you really are and who you are going to become in life.

13. Are you optimistic about finding a job after college?

I am very optimistic about finding a job after college since I know that a college degree opens many doors and there will always be room for one more college graduate in any job. As for me thanks to my BA I was able to find a great job relating to my field of study where I get to interact with students K-12 on a daily basis and it brings me closer to my ultimate career goal.

———————————————————————————————————–

As always, I hope you all enjoyed this interview and gained something from it. Stay tuned for my next interview!

I’ll keep you posted.

-Paige

Advertisements

Paige’s Interview with Bell

InterviewsCollegeStudents

In my quest to find out if college is worth the effort, I interviewed my friend, Bell, about her pursuit of a college education and plans after she earns her Bachelors degree. Bell is a senior at UC Davis pursuing a degree in Animal Science.

Fast Facts:

Hometown: Bangkok, Thailand

Favorite Color: Light blue/black/white

Dream Job: Veterinarian!

Favorite Animal: Elephant/white tiger

1. What were your top college picks & why?

It was UC Davis, University of Illinois. University of Illinois has a vet school and I already knew from high school that I wanted to go to vet school. I was like, which one is the best and I went to the US ranking and went down from there. I wanted to go somewhere else that is not California, so I was like, University of Illinois might be a great fit. Plus I’d heard it was a good school. Also, they have good livestock.

2. Why did you choose UC Davis?

I chose UC Davis also because of the animal program. I heard that they had good animal experience programs. My high school counselor told me I wasn’t going to get in. She just told me straight up, ‘no you’re not going to get in’. She said ‘You’re SAT score is not high enough for UC Davis. You’re never going to get in’ and then I cried. I was so sad and I cried.

3. When you applied to UC Davis, did you think you’d get in?

No.

4. What did you do in high school to prepare for college?

I didn’t prepare anything.

5. What drew you to your current career goal or field instead of others?

At first I wanted to be a human doctor. I love science, medicine, physiology and all that. At the time, my parents were wanting me to be a doctor because in Thailand it is a good job and people respect you. One day I started to [realize] I don’t see myself being a doctor.  I came to the U.S. because my mom thought I wanted to be a doctor.  When I was in high school I just interacted more with animals and my sister suggested [I] look into being a vet. I had never thought about that. So I said I would give it a try. I started contacting veterinarians in Thailand to see if they wanted to let me do some work for them. I got a volunteer job and it all started from there. After I started volunteering there for a while I started seeing that I wanted to do this more and more. In college I tried to confirm that I didn’t want to be a doctor by doing an emergency medicine internship at the UC Davis Medical Center. It was a horrible two months.  It was a 2 quarter commitment, so I couldn’t quit. I look forward to [doing veterinary stuff] and know that I really like doing this stuff.

6. How important is happiness in your future career?

A lot. I don’t have any troubles about money, so maybe that’s why I prefer happiness more than money. I know vets don’t make a lot. In Thailand they make a normal office worker salary. It’s super low. You can’t have savings or anything. It’s that bad, but I still want to do it . It’s more for my happiness.

7. What do you expect to get out of college?

I expect it to prepare me for vet school, so give me a lot of animal experience. Actually it didn’t give me animal experience, I had to find it. It just provided me the resources. I also expect some basic knowledge about science and physiology that I have to know in order to live life and work in a professional school.

8. Before you started college, what was your vision of life after attaining a college degree and how has that vision changed?

I guess it’s more realistic now, in that I can see what exactly I want to do. Before I was like ‘Oh yeah I’m going to be a vet. I’m going to stay in Thailand and that’s it’. That’s life. Now it’s more like there are other options, I can do shelter [medicine]. I can stay in America and help out with the community. I know more options abut what I’m going to do. There are so many visions that I have for myself, but for now if I were to be a vet I can see myself working in a local clinic or mobile clinic and then also, maybe on weekends helping out at the shelter or things like that. I also want to travel with vets to underdeveloped countries where they go and help. That’s a cool thing to do.

9. What is the greatest challenge that you’ve faced in your efforts to gain an education?

Trying to get A’s. The schoolwork. Internships and research was very hard to find. You have to face a lot of rejection and people who are not nice to you and look down on you. It’s a challenge because you really need vet hours, but the technician may piss you off, but you can’t quit. It’s like one of those challenges. I worked at a vet office and the vet and I didn’t fit. Maybe I was too shy and she wanted more of a talkative person. They were very rude to me and they said “You need to learn faster,” but I only went there 4 times in a month. It was like do I learn slow or do you not have time to teach me?  So it’s more like well who are you going to blame. I’m not going to blame them.

10. If you could go back in time and talk to your younger self, what would you say?

Study harder. Don’t play a lot of online games. I used to be addicted to online games. I was a hardcore gamer.

11. Has your pursuit of a higher education been worth it?

Yep. It’s worth it.

12. Do you think you would have been better off just getting a job or skipping college altogether?

No, I feel college is an experience that you can’t really skip. If you really need the money, then you can skip college. I feel it’s an experience that you should not just skip. Plus you can get connections from college, like professors. Those professors are awesome. You learn so much more than if you just stop at high school and go work right away. I feel like those people are smart, but once you go to college, it exposes you to so many things and different kinds of people and you will be better off coping with different kinds of  people. Like in your work setting and things like that.

13. Are you optimistic about finding a job after college?

No! No! Hell no! I know it’s very difficult and I’ve heard a lot of bad stories about people getting kicked out of companies because of the economy. So I’m not positive at all.

———————————————————————————————————–

As always, I hope you all enjoyed this interview and gained something from it. Stay tuned for my next interview!

I’ll keep you posted.

-Paige

Paige’s Interview with Jose

InterviewsCollegeStudents

I recently interviewed my friend, Jose, about his pursuit of a college education and plans after he earns his Bachelors degree. Jose is a senior at UC Davis pursuing a degree in the Biological Sciences. Before attending UC Davis, Jose attended Bakersfield College in Bakersfield, CA.

Fast Facts:

Hometown: Bakersfield, California

Favorite Color: Blue & Gold

Dream Job: Doctor

Favorite Animal: Dog

1. What were your top college picks & why?

I only really knew about UCLA and so I wanted to go there, but they didn’t really teach us how to go to college or how to pay for it.  I just talked to my football coaches about it. They were also Biology professors so  I asked one of them and he said, “There is CSUB and Bakersfield College, so why don’t you just try out football because you’re really good, so you can get a scholarship so you can go to a university. Try it out for one or two years and if you don’t like it, then you can transfer out”. I kinda wanted to go to CSUB and I got in, but I didn’t take my SATs, so I just went to Bakersfield College.

2. What were your top picks while you were transferring?

I think UCLA and Davis were my top picks. UCLA just because of the name and it was associated with medicine, but I was hearing lots of bad things about it. I heard that everyone was really mean and that if you ask someone what the day of a test is, then they will give you the wrong date. I went to the Davis campus and everyone was super nice. I applied to Santa Barbara, Davis, UCLA, and maybe Irvine. I got accepted by UCLA and Davis.

3. Why did you choose UC Davis?

Because of the things that I heard and I liked the campus and everything. I got to know the campus really well.

4. When you applied to UC Davis, did you think you’d get in?

I was hoping, but had no idea because my GPA wasn’t great. I had a lot extracurricular activities, so I don’t know if they balanced each other out.

5. What did you do in high school to prepare for college?

I tried to get into as many clubs as I could because I thought that would help. I joined the French club and Cross club, which was a Christian club.  I did a lot of sports, football, wrestling, and track for a little bit. I joined the CSF program.

**CSF is short for the California Scholarship Federation.

6. What drew you to your current career goal or field instead of others?

I wanted to [become a doctor] since I was in high school. When I got to Bakersfield College in my first year, I thought this is taking too long, I’m going to be a nurse. There was this guy who was super smart and me and him were friends. His dad was a doctor, so he wanted to be a doctor. I wanted to be a nurse. He was talking to me and said, “no you should be a doctor”. Later on, I don’t know how I changed my mind, but I think I just said F***k it I will just be a doctor. I wanted to help people anyway and might as well get paid more, so I decided to become a doctor. I was working on the prerequisites for nursing school instead of medical school, so I changed that. Later that guy ended up not wanting to be a doctor anymore because it’s too hard. I wanted to help people directly and the medical field is a direct way of helping them.

7. How important is happiness in your future career?

I think it’s one of the most important things, because part of the reason I chose it is because I thought I would be happy with it. If I end up being a doctor and after 10 years hating life, then I’d probably stop being a doctor.

8. What do you expect to get out of college?

A degree, to prepare myself for becoming a doctor, and just having fun. I don’t really care about the degree because I need it for medical school. If I didn’t need it for medical school, then I probably wouldn’t have gone. A degree is just a paper saying that you took these classes, but I don’t think it separates you that much. I think you should get a degree for what you want. Don’t just go to school just to get a degree. If your field requires you to get a degree and that’s what you want to do, then get a degree, but don’t just go to school just to get a degree.

9. Before you started college, what was your vision of life after attaining a college degree and how has that vision changed?

In high school I thought [college] would be a lot easier than it turned out to be, but college is a lot harder than high school. High school was pretty easy, so I figured I’m a pretty smart guy,  so college shouldn’t be that much harder, but it was pretty hard. Then I realized more about being a doctor and it doesn’t seem as easy. Sometimes it doesn’t seem like it might be worth it. Like, when you’re in high school you’re like “oh that guy is a doctor, he helps people, he makes a lot of money, and he seems like he has a great life”. But when you go to college, you learn more about being a doctor, you get internships and talk to doctors and see how their lives are and you go “Oh he’s working like 80 hrs a week, that doesn’t seem fun, and he’s in a bunch of debt”. Going into college gave me more of a realistic view.

10. What is the greatest challenge that you’ve faced in your efforts to gain an education?

The hardest thing was money. Even now, I’m taking loans and I have financial aid, but even then toward the end of the quarter I’m eating cup of noodles for the last 2 weeks. That sucks. So it sucks stressing out over money and stressing out over school. There’s free tutoring, but it would have been nice to have a private tutor. It’s a good thing and a bad thing, because it made the education more valuable to me. I’m working to pay for school and I’ll take almost any money from my parents. It’s not easy for me sometimes, I have to struggle for it. So I don’t take it for granted. I have to do well.  I can’t go another year because I can’t afford another year. I can’t fail my classes. I have to study a lot more because I don’t have any tutors. I have to learn it on my own, so that takes a little more time. For me it’s more do or die. I just have to have to do this. There is pressure. The pressure helps, but it’s also really sh*tty.

I also feel pressure because my dad is older and he has health issues. Eventually he is not going to be able to support anybody and it’s going to be up to the kids. I will have to help my mom out and my younger brother and sister. I want to get thru everything as soon as I can, but I can’t because I have to take my time.

11. If you could go back in time and talk to your younger self, what would you say?

I’d say study even more. I don’t think I have any regrets. It took me longer than I thought it would, but I also had more time to enjoy myself.

12. Has your pursuit of a higher education been worth it?

Not yet because I’m still in the process. I think college is worth it for different fields. You are seen as more valuable with a degree and get experience and can start working. It is different for different fields. Fro example, being an actor. A lot of people go to college for it, but that doesn’t guarantee you a job, so you could do it the nontraditional way. College is where you get connections, like internships, research opportunities, and professors.

13. Do you think you would have been better off just getting a job or skipping college altogether?

No, because it’s really hard and then it’s impossible as a doctor.

14. Are you optimistic about finding a job after college?

Yeah, for a doctor it’s almost guaranteed.

15. What if you don’t get into medical school the first time you apply? Are you optimistic about finding a job then?

If I don’t get in, I will work. I [am already planning to] take a year off because I couldn’t finish my MCAT on time, and I talked to a peer adviser at Bakersfield College, and I would get a job there. I could find stuff around Davis. I feel like there is a lot of jobs, not good jobs, but enough to help me.

As always, I hope you all enjoyed this interview and gained something from it. Stay tuned for my next interview!

I’ll keep you posted.

-Paige

Paige’s Interview with Todd

InterviewsCollegeStudents

My friend “Todd” agreed to do an interview with me today to explore his motivation to attend college, his journey through college, and his expectations for life after he earns his Bachelors degree. Todd is a college junior at UC Davis pursuing an Animal Science degree.

*Note: This student did not want to reveal his identity and he’s camera shy, so we will call him “Todd”.

Fast Facts:

Hometown: Manteca, California

Favorite Color: Violet

Dream Job: Veterinarian

Favorite Animal: Dragon

1. What were your top college picks & why?

UC Davis because that’s the number one vet school, Cornell because that was number two for vet school, Humbolt because they had a zoology program there, but I also wanted a state school as backup, and then Cal Poly I also knew had an ag department. Then, also, I applied to Monterey, because I knew they had a Marine Biology Program and they also had animal science and EOP becauseI wanted to apply at least to one private school and it was more or less close by.

I got accepted to Humbolt & Davis…but Cornell kept sending me emails, they were like telling me to try to transfer. EOP I got waitlisted. Davis was my number one. Cornell it was like I want to get in, but at the same time I don’t know if I would have because its really pricey and then moving over there.

2. Why did you choose UC Davis?

Davis is one of the best vet schools nationally and probably internationally too, and plus its closer to home which I always liked.

3. When you applied to UC Davis, did you think you’d get in?

I thought I could, there was a chance but I also knew there was a chance that I wouldn’t, so I was more nervous. I wasn’t for sure about it, but I had a feeling that I might. One of my teachers said that if you’re in the top 10 % at your school you’re guaranteed acceptance to one UC, its not guaranteed which one, but you are guaranteed to one. And that’s the reason I only applied to one UC, just in case.

4. What did you do in high school to prepare for college?

I took 13 AP classes, I took the PSAT like three times, the SAT twice, the ACT once, I joined the Kewanis club, so I could get community service, so that I could beef up my application.

5. What drew you to your current career goal or field instead of others?

I always liked animals and always wanted to be around them. It wasn’t ’til I had a bird [canary] that ended up getting a disease, and the fact that I couldn’t help the bird, and I think that drew me more toward veterinarian, instead of being a zookeeper or animal behaviorist. Like, helping animals in pain.

6. How important is happiness in your future career?

I feel like it’s one of the most important factors, because you need to be able to continue what you’re doing or else your life quality will go downhill and you don’t want to be waking up every single day, that’s how people get depressed. Depression leads to suicide.

7. What do you expect to get out of college?

What I expect to get is pretty much the proof that I was able to go and do a strenuous task and stick with it so that employers can see that, and so I have a better chance to get a job. So pretty much to get a job…well, a well paying job.

8. Before you started college, what was your vision of life after attaining a college degree and how has that vision changed?

The only vision that has changed is probably not going to vet school, but I feel like most of my other beliefs have stayed the same..about life in general, like how I viewed life stayed the same. It’s just like some of my goals have been altered, which would be vet school. I feel like that is really the only change that I see in myself. How I perceive the world, I feel that is still the same. Like, how I view people when I see someone walking down the street. How I interact with someone, I don’t know. Its hard to explain, but there hasn’t really been a change in that. I guess my mentality has stayed the same.

9. What is your mentality?

You reap what you sow.

10. What is the greatest challenge that you’ve faced in your efforts to gain an education?

While I was trying to get into college, it was definitely a lot of the application process and figuring out how to make myself stand out. In college, it was probably the chemistry courses – so far in college that has been the biggest challenge for me.

11. If you could go back in time and talk to your younger self, what would you say?

Go to more office hours in college my freshman year and go to tutoring more.

12. Has your pursuit of a higher education been worth it?

I feel like right now it’s too early to tell because I haven’t received [a degree]. So I can’t really see how my life has changed with it. I expected myself to go to college so it’s hard to say. I guess I was expecting to go to college and was expecting to have this lifestyle more or less, so I don’t know I can envision my life without going to college.

13. Do you think you would have been better off just getting a job or skipping college altogether?

I don’t think so, to employers I feel that there is a bias, and you seem less appealing unless you have personal connections. So I feel like they would view you more negatively compared to someone with a degree. So I feel like with a degree, you have a higher chance of getting a job.

14. Are you optimistic about finding a job after college?

I feel like no, but I feel like my chances would be higher than if I didn’t, so I know that having a degree is going to help, but I’m sure I will find a job, its just that I don’t know how long it will be after getting my degree.

15. Which is better- experience or education?

I feel like experience is better short-term and education is better long-term, because I feel like with experience you already know how to do things, so you can perform more adequately at the time; but if you go with education, you’ll have less experience, but you have knowledge of different things that you can later apply once you start getting those experiences and be able to progress yourself even further than someone who just has experience and are more limited in mindset. So I feel like long-term education is better.

As always, I hope you all enjoyed this interview and gained something from it. Stay tuned for my next interview!

I’ll keep you posted.

-Paige

Introducing: Paige’s Interviews with College Students

As I neared the end of my senior year in college, I read an article about the worth of a college education. I was shocked to learn that there is a growing number of people who believe that college is worthless. I remember in high school everyone-our parents, counselors, teachers, and classmates-pushed us all to apply to college. I remember as a senior in high school thinking that if only I went to college my life would be changed for the better. It was this enthusiasm that kept me so devoted to finishing my college education. This is why hearing that college is worthless is of such importance to me, to graduating high school seniors, and to current college students. I think a good way to gain insight into this issue to hear from the students who are currently pursuing their own college education. Here is the first of several interviews with college students:

InterviewsCollegeStudents

I arranged an interview with my friend “Sally,” who is a college senior at UC Davis pursuing an Animal Science degree. The purpose of this interview was to learn about her motivation to attend college, her journey through college, and her expectations for life after she completes her Bachelors degree.

*Note: This student did not want to reveal her identity so we will call her “Sally.”

Fast Facts:

Hometown: Stockton, California

Favorite Color: Violet

Dream Job: Doctor

Favorite Animal: Cat, then Chicken

1. Why did you choose UC Davis?

Because it accepted me before Fresno State did.

2. Did you end up getting accepted by Fresno State?

I did.

3. What?! So why did you choose Davis?

Because it was closer. It’s an hour away. Fresno is 2 hours away.

4. That’s crazy-we wouldn’t have met!

I know haha.

5. Can you tell me about your journey to UC Davis and college? You can start with high school.

Mmm..I didn’t do much in high school.

6. So did you see yourself going to college in high school.

I think so… no.

7. So what did you think back then?

I was like “I’ll just get a job and things will work out.”

8. What made you decide to go to college instead of working?

My friends were going to college and I was like “I should start doing something with myself”. So I started going. Also, my sister was pregnant at the time, so I wanted to compete with her.

9. And how did you start the process?

I just went to school, my community college and I’m like “What do I need?” and they told me what I needed, they told me what I needed to do, and I did it.

10. What was your end goal?

To be a nurse, which did not work out because the nursing program didn’t accept me.

11. So, how did you end up making your way to Davis?

I spent like forever at my community college, did a bunch of different programs, and I was like I like animals, I should be a vet. And I’m like I should just apply to UC Davis and so I did. I didn’t really want to be a vet.

12. You didn’t really want to be a vet?

I mean, like, I wanted to be in, like, the medical field I guess.

13. What drew you there versus any other field?

They make money.

14. What do you expect to get out of college?

I expect to get a job, and it better not be working at OSH because I have a damn degree.

15. Before you started college, what was your vision of life after attaining a college degree? How has your vision changed from then to now?

Then I was like, I’ll be out of college in 2 years, I’ll be a nurse. I’ll have my life together. And now I’m like, I don’t even know what I’m going to do when I graduate. Hopefully find a good job, a good career. But I was more optimistic back in the day. Now I’m, like, realistic I guess.

16. What made that change?

Maybe being at community college for all those damn years. All those programs rejecting me.

17. What other programs did you apply to at your community college?

The radiology program, applied to EOP for pharmacy, Radiology technician-they never got me. Mmmm what else? That’s it.

18. When you applied to Davis did you think you’d get in?

Hell no! I was like, oh my god, they made a mistake. Look at my GPA! They made a mistake!

19. Really?

Yeah because all my classmates, were like “oh my god I needed to get a TAG and you need a 3.5 if you don’t have one they say you wont get in.” So I was like you know what I didn’t get a TAG, my GPA is not even above a 3.0, I’m probably not going to get in.

20. What has been the most difficult part of pursuing a college education?

Probably I can’t keep to one thing. I keep changing my mind. I keep getting bored.

21. Why do you feel you get bored?

I don’t know. It’s not that I get bored, it’s just that if this doesn’t work out let me just do something else. Ok, that didn’t work out? Let me do this. Ok, that didn’t work out? Let me do this. Instead of sticking with it and working harder, I just switch and then I have to start again. And then switch, oh no I have to start again. And then switch because now they require this and that. I think that’s what it is.

22. Right now you are deciding between applying to vet school and med school. Which one are you going to pursue and if it doesn’t go your way what’s your next step?

I’m probably going to pursue medical, because I know vets don’t make money. And my whole point of going to school was so that I could make a lot of money. I don’t care if I save animals. I can save them as a doctor.

23. So what if you apply and they don’t accept you?

Well I’m hoping to get a state job and I’ll just keep it for the next 40 years.

24. But you won’t reapply to medical school again?

No, I’ll just give up then. If I have a good career that I can see being long term and it pays good, then I’m just going to quit it [medical school]. But if I don’t have anything then I might as well keep applying. I’ll get in eventually.

25. So how important is happiness in your future career?

Not very. I just want money. Money will make me happy. Knowing that I can pay the bills and I can help my family out will make me happy. I stayed at OSH for 4 years and I wasn’t happy there.

26. If you could go back in time and talk to your younger self, what would you say? 

I would tell myself stop goofing off, because when I started school at first I was like “Oh my god, I don’t need to study blah blah blah.” And that’s why my GPA was so low because, when I first started I was like “I don’t care I’m just going to go to school, get my financial aid,” and after my financial aid finished I was like “Sh*t I better get my sh*t together.” That was three years in though, that was too late. I couldn’t pick myself back up.

27. Has your pursuit of a higher education been worth it?

I don’t think so…I don’t know.

28. Do you think you would have been better off just getting a job or skipping college all together?

Well, I’m hoping that it will have paid off, but I won’t know til I graduate and get an actual job. If I find a job that I could have found without having a degree, then it’s not worthless. But if I find a job that I needed a degree in, then it’s worth it. It just depends after I graduate and when I find a job. But right now I don’t know.

29. Are you optimistic about finding a job?

Yes. I’m hoping to find a state job. And they require Bachelors. So I guess it’s worth it. But if I don’t, I don’t have a back up.

I hope you all enjoyed this interview and gained something from it. Stay tuned for my next interview!

I’ll keep you posted.

-Paige